Buffalo Shrimp – Hooters Style

Buffalo Shrimp Video (scroll down for printable recipe)

As a follow-up to my Breastaurant review video, here is a delicious homemade Buffalo shrimp recipe, a la Hooters. Between you and me (and everyone else on the planet) these are at least a smidge better than Hooters, if only because I use large shrimp and my Buffalo sauce is made as the chicken wing gods intended, with sweet cream butter instead of cheap-ass margarine.

This recipe really couldn’t be simpler. Peeled shrimp are dunked in a light egg wash, then gently dredged in seasoned flour and let to rest for a few minutes in the fridge. Fry in a couple inches of very hot vegetable oil so the shrimp cook fast and crispy without soaking up a lot of oil. Cool on a rack before drizzling with the Buffalo sauce. You could toss them with the sauce, but shrimp are much more delicate than wings so I like to treat them a little nicer.

Serve with lemon wedges to keep it simple, but a side of homemade blue cheese dressing is really where it’s at. Celery sticks are a good palate cleanser and they are really tasty when slathered in the leftover blue cheese dressing that’s got specks of Buffalo sauce all in it.

For more about deep frying and cooking oils, read this post.

Buffalo Shrimp Recipe – Printable!

hooters buffalo shrimp recipe

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Buffalo Shrimp – Hooters Style

5 from 8 reviews

  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 15 mins
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 pound large (21/25 count) shrimp
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup Frank’s Red Hot sauce
  • (dash habanero sauce for extra spice)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon spicy seasoned salt (I use Tony Chachere’s)
  • 2 cups (approx) vegetable oil for frying (canola, corn, peanut, grapeseed)
  • Lemon wedges and/or blue cheese dressing

Instructions

  1. Peel and devein the shrimp, leaving tails on for a prettier presentation. Set aside.
  2. Combine butter, Frank’s and habanero sauce in a small pot and heat on low until melted. Keep warm.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk eggs and water until thoroughly combined.
  4. In a large bowl, combine flour and seasoning salt.
  5. One at a time, dip each shrimp by the tail into the egg, drain, then gently roll in flour. Coat all shrimp this way, leaving them in the flour bowl as they are covered.
  6. Place the bowl in the fridge to rest while you heat the oil in a deep pot. Oil should be 1 1/2 – 2 inches deep.
  7. Heat oil to 375ºF
  8. Toss shrimp in flour once more to be sure all are thoroughly coated. Carefully drop into hot oil, frying 6-8 shrimp at a time. Adjust the flame to keep the temperature between 360-380ºF
  9. Fry about 3 minutes or until golden brown. Remove with slotted spoon and let drain on a rack.
  10. Just before serving, drizzle with warm Buffalo sauce.

Notes

Nutrition

  • Calories: 400
  • Fat: 14

buffalo shrimp

Watch our Breastaurant Review!

The thermometer I use for frying (affiliate link)

Comments

  1. I was literally sitting in my room crying desperately (more like procrastinating desperately) because I have like 450 exams at college this week and I haven’t even opened up a book and damn I don’t want to (organizational communication? Really? Can it get more boring?) AND THEN this shows up on facebook and now I’m all happy and cheered up (is “cheered” a word?). The shrimp looks fantaboulastic Hilah! Superfantaboulastic crispy toasty juicy amazing to be more precise. Lots of love :*

    • Cheered is totally a word! And I’m happy to have cheered you. 😀 Now go study for your exams and make all A’s and then you can have some Buffalo shrimp. XOXO

  2. Hey, Hilah!

    I know this is a total newbie question, but could you explain exactly how to use a thermometer for things like this? What depth should it be in the oil? Should it be touching the bottom of the pot/pan or hovering above it? Should you have several different types of thermometers in your kitchen for different things, or is one good enough to handle everything? For instance, do I need to go out and buy a meat thermometer, a candy thermometer, an oil thermometer, etc, or is just one good one enough to handle all of those things? It seems like such a basic thing that no one really goes into detail about, but it’s always confused me.

    • Charlie Lowell says:

      I don’t have a glass thermometer for saucepans & such. I keep a digital lazer thermometer next to the stove. It’s not exactly passive like the clip on ones are, but it seems to work well for me. Use it on the grill & smoker too. They’re fairly cheap and quite accurate.

      • Thanks, Charlie! I’ve never used one of those. I don’t know if that kind would work for deep frying since it just measures the surface temperature of whatever you point it at, right?

    • Hi Kevin!

      Sure thing. I’ll add the link to the thermometer I use, too. So analog candy and deep frying therm’s are pretty interchangeable because they cover the same range of temps (up to 550ºF or so). Analog meat therm’s don’t go that high because if your meat is at 500 degrees, it’s on fire 😉 So you can use a candy/frying therm to measure meat sometimes but not vice-versa. Digital thermometers are your best bet if you want one that can measure everything (though Mitchster commented here that in fact the Polder therm I use is NOT intended for grilling, only oven cooking).

      For frying, you want the thermometer at 1/2-1 inch below the surface, but not touching the bottom of the pot. Try to center it as much as possible (this is why a thermometer with a clip is helpful)

  3. The Other Randy says:

    If I remember correctly, Buffalo wings were invented as a means of using up a surplus of chicken wings. Being one who thinks that chicken wings are only suitable for making chicken stock, I think I’ve only had Buffalo wings only three times. I thought they tasted great, but wondered why nobody made Buffalo thighs or Buffalo breasts (maybe those would be too obvious for a place like Hooters). I love the idea of Buffalo shrimp!!! I could halve the recipe and pig out on them on my weekly day of gluttony.

    This video reminded me of asking you for a recommendation for a thermometer. Thanks so much for recommending the Polder. It’s hands down the best one I’ve ever owned (and I’ve owned several). Ironically, it won’t be used when I make the Buffalo shrimp. One of the few one-trick pony appliances I own is a deep fryer with a thermostat. It’s silly but deep frying in a pot scares me. I love my Waring Pro, but I’m scared to death that the Waring police are going to bust in and confiscate it when they find out I’m an amateur.

    • Hey Randy!
      You can definitely do Buffalo chicken breast. Boneless fried chick breast tossed in the Buffalo sauce … man it’s good. What deep fryer do you have? I still have the fry daddy jr, but it doesn’t regulate the temperature. I was given a Ninja fryer by the company but the second time I went to use it, it no longer worked!

      • The Other Randy says:

        I have this one: http://amzn.to/1H1ncDY. Actually it’s the second one I’ve owned. The first one is still working fine. I briefly had an obsession with fish and chips, so I bought a second one. When I had to downsize due to moving to an apartment with a smaller kitchen, I gave the original one to my sister. The second one is much easier to clean as it has an enameled, removable fry bucket. It’s also big enough that if you take a hacksaw and whack off 2 of the 8 tortilla slots on a restaurant taco shell fryer basket, it’ll fit. Here’s the one I have: http://amzn.to/1ylkqru. Of course I usually only go to the trouble to use it when I have guests over for the Fonda de Hilah Deluxe Combination Plate #1.

  4. The Other Randy says:

    Oh, yeah! I forgot to thank you for that great tip on draining the shrimp. That totally eliminates any need I have for paper towels. It’s going to be interesting now to see how long it takes to use up the half a roll I have.

  5. Mitchster says:

    Hey Hilah, Can’t wait to make and eat this. About the Polder thermometer, I found out the hard way you’re not supposed to use it for grilling. Apparently when you grill there can be “heat flares” that can and will kill the thermometer probe rendering it useless. I guess it’s written somewhere in those tiny printed instructions that come with it. Fortunately the nice folks at Polder sent me a complimentary replacement probe. Yay Polder! So just FYI. Love your videos and your book.

    • Oh man! Thank you! I have used it a couple times grilling but you’re right, I just looked and it says only safe up to 360ºF. So I guess it would be fine to use in the oven for a roast turkey or something, but def not in a grill where it might be 500 degrees.
      Thanks for the correction and thanks for buying my book! 😀

  6. This looks delicious.. I do feel like grilling it though!

  7. Hi Hilah, made these delicious gems earlier this week! Seriously amazing! I’m actually going to make them again tomorrow!

    Thanks again for the recipe!

  8. What’s the steel box with the lower clear part on the counter return behind you? And what happened to the Fry Daddy? I assume it’s only because of the need for 375F. Though anti-specialized kitchen devices, I bought one based on your common sense arguments. I love being able to put the cover on and stick in the thing fridge for a few rounds of frying over a few days. Love your site and was on because I bought some bomb-diggity thick pork chops and want simple recipe ideas for a school night.

    • Fry Daddy ? answered, read the other posts. What’s the box?

    • Hey Bob!
      It’s an ice crusher. Chris is very fond of tiny ice in all his drinks. 🙂 Maybe some day we will get one of those ridiculously expensive custom ice machines that makes ice like Sonic.

      • The Other Randy says:

        My immediate impression was that that was what it is! Even to the point of thinking that it was the very same model I have (Waring). But then I talked myself out of it. Now I realize that the camera view of yours is from a different angle than the one from which I normally see mine. This is my second Waring ice crusher. The first one died, probably because I kept banging it on the counter to free up ice cubes that got stuck in the crushing mechanism. Waring seems to have improved it so that it now handles 1″ square cubes from Tovolo silicon trays without problems. Yay, Waring!

        If you do get that expensive ice machine, may I say that I’m available for adoption?

  9. Hilah,
    I see that Carlos is back tomorrow ! This is good ! Last time he was on his audio was a bit low. Just Sayin.I enjoy the chemistry between you two… anyway.. the real reason im calling is this. I often go the the International Grocery for almost all of my produce during the off season months. There are many items there that are completly foriegn to me and I’m sure many others. Many roots, tubers “growths”cactus, Other than the Latino items This place seems to carry those items I’m guessing are in Island, African and South American cuisine. Maybe down the road a show featuring these “odditys” would be fun ? All of you be well.

    Bill….And yes I’d be happy to list those items if needed.

  10. Hilah!!!
    Omg I just tried this at home and it was a super success!!!
    Delicious!!! very accurate recipe!!!
    I think I’m going to die from a food coma!!!
    Thanks Hila for posting the recipe!!
    Love your videos and personality!

  11. FoodJunkie says:

    Another winner Hilah. Crispy shrimp in a sauce seems strange but it totally works. As fanatic for Buffalo wings I will be giving this a try. Thanks for having proper respect for the Buffalo sauce. Too many weird variations out there being passed off as Buffalo wing sauce. (I don’t mind the weird variations, just don’t call it Buffalo)

    • FoodJunkie says:

      I finally got a chance to make these and they are indeed simple and delicious.

  12. Claudia says:

    Hi, Great recipe!! I’m happy I found your blog! I know the best way is to fry them, but is it possible to bake them? Thanks!

    • Hi Claudia!
      I have not tried baking these because I don’t really like the way flour-dredged things come out in the oven. they are never very crispy. If I were to try a baked version, I’d use some fine cracker crumbs instead of flour to make sure they come out crunchy. Dip in egg, then crumbs, then bake at 425F for maybe 8-10 minutes until firm.

  13. I knew that you would come threw. I need a great party treat, and I thought, well, maybe fish. But I don’t like for fish to taste like fish. Why do fish have to taste fishy anyway? Cod I can handle. But this wonderful recipe give me a great party treat, and ‘nothing fishy here’ to my taste buds. Thanks.

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