Demon Eyes! (Pickled Deviled Eggs) Plus How to Boil Eggs

Deviled eggs have been around since the dawn of mayonnaise, I believe.

They are called “deviled eggs” because they’re a little spicy and the devil probably likes spicy food because he lives in Hell where it’s really, really hot. Devil also is real big into Halloween and so am I so I thought deviled eggs would be a great party food to make on the show!

For some reason, deviled eggs are present at nearly every potluck, family reunion, and football party I’ve ever attended. I can guess why. They’re cute, bite-size, and can be made the day before. They’re also not completely unhealthy, compared to some of the other things on the food table, and assuming you’re not eating a whole dozen of them. They are also very easy to put your own twist on and impress the hell out of some people because you thought to add curry powder or chopped olives or capers or jalapenos or cilantro or any number of ingredients that suit your fancy. Figure out what “twist” you like and make it that way a couple of times and suddenly you’ll be getting requests for “those good deviled eggs you make” and then you won’t ever have to think about what to take to a potluck again!

My particular twist is to make them look like blood-shot demon eyeballs for Halloween! YAY! HALLOWEEN!

Deviled Eggs Recipe

But I really try not to use food coloring when I can help it. So I’m using beet juice! Pickled beet juice, to be precise, which has the added perk of flavoring the egg whites and firming them up a bit so they are easier to stuff without breaking. If you’ve ever had a pickled egg, you know the texture they take on when soaked in pickling brine. My friends that normally don’t like boiled egg whites, citing a “yucky texture”, like them this way. I presume you could do the same trick with pickled jalapeno juice instead and end up with some slightly-yellow, but delightfully spicy egg whites! Maybe do a few of each and call the yellow ones monster eyes or something cute like that.

The trickiest part of making deviled eggs by far is boiling the eggs right. You want them hard-boiled, easy to peel, and with the yolks as centered as possible. For ease of peeling , get some eggs that aren’t the absolute freshest. You can just buy a dozen a week before you’ll boil them and leave them in the fridge, or check the dates on the ones in the store and find a dozen that are maybe a week or two out from the expiration date. The reason for this is that slightly older eggs don’t cling so tightly to the inner membrane and the shell will almost just slip off. Once you have your eggs, do like this:

How to Boil Eggs

  1. Put the eggs in a pot and add enough water to cover them by at least 1/2″ and up to 1″ (Cook an egg or two more than you need in case one should break or be hard to peel.
  2. Put the pot over high heat and stir the eggs gently every couple of minutes until it reaches a boil. Moving the eggs around as they heat will help keep the yolks centered.
  3. Once it boils, put a lid on the pot and turn the heat off. Leave them in there for 8-12 minutes, depending on how big they are.
  4. While you wait, get a large bowl and fill it with ice and water.
  5. When the eggs are done, use tongs to move them from the hot pot into the ice water. This sudden change in temperature is going to make peeling them a LOT easier.
  6. Let them cool in there about 5-10 minutes, then take them out one by one and gently tap them on the counter on all sides to crack the shells all over. Put the eggs back in the cold water as you crack them to cool more and let the water seep under the membrane to help peeling even more!
  7. Peel the shell and the underlying membrane off of each egg and refrigerate until you are ready to make deviled eggs! If you need to keep them over night, cover with a damp towel before refrigerating so they don’t dry out.

Now let’s make the Deviled Eggs!

Deviled Eggs
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 6 hard-boiled eggs, peeled
  • 1 cup of pickled beet juice
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons yellow mustard
  • 1-2 pickled banana peppers (or jalapenos if you like)
  • ¼-1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper for spicier eggs
  • 6 green olives with pimentos
Instructions
  1. Slice the eggs lengthwise in half, using a sharp, non-serrated knife.. Rinsing your knife in cold water between eggs will make slicing easier.
  2. Pop the yolks out and set aside.
  3. Put the whites in a container and cover with the beet juice. Let sit for 5 minutes for a light pink color, and up to 24 hours for a dark purple color (I like the longer soak time for more flavor and color, plus a firmer texture).
  4. Mash the yolks with a fork. They will seem crumbly and dry. No worries.
  5. Add the mayonnaise, mustard, peppers, cayenne, and a little of the pepper juice if you like. Mash to make a very smooth, silky paste.
  6. Use a small spoon to fill each egg white cup with a mound of the yolk spread.
  7. Slice the green olives in half and press into each mound to make the demon eye pupil.
  8. Serve immediately or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

If you want to throw a whole party based on Halloween recipes from my site, check out these episodes from last year! (Also check out my SWEET costumes of days-gone-by.)

Halloween Cocktail: Bumbaclot!
Marshmallow Ghosties!
Hallow-peno Poppers

And check this out for regular old deviled eggs!

Comments

  1. I like your idea of just pickling the whites to make rosy deviled eggs. You asked for sources of yellow cayenne powder. For yellow cayenne or “cayenne-ish” powder, google “aji amarillo” powder. There are a few brands out there or you can order from some place like Kalustyan’s (http://tinyurl.com/3ms9yz6) in NYC.

    I haven’t made pickled eggs in a long time. I should do it again. Usually, I just waited until a jar of pickled beets was at least half-way empty, then dumped in some hard-cooked eggs and maybe a little sliced onion.. If necessary, I top the jar off with white vinegar. Then, I took to work a beet-pickled egg (http://flic.kr/p/PbnW3) or beet-pickled egg salad (http://flic.kr/p/4xDi9a).

    • Oh yummy! A friend sent me some fresh yellow aji peppers he grew, and I’ve heard of them bottled, but I didn’t know you could buy it powdered. I’m going to order some.

      That’s how my grandma does her pickled eggs, too. As much as I like pickled beets, I don’t normally keep them around so I don’t normally have a half-empty jar. I love the idea of adding sliced onion to it, though. And I always love your bento box photos. (And Samoas are my favorite!)

  2. OOOoooOOO! Spooky and yummy – I really like the idea of pickling the egg whites…I kind of want to just soak them in the pepper juice (I wonder if they would turn a yellow/green color?) for the flavor.

    Also, you are a Stone Fox in yer Tinkerbell get up!

  3. I wasn’t supposed to have to provide any food for the playoffs in exchange for hosting, but I couldn’t resist and made a double batch of these. All I can say is that the guests had better hurry up and arrive or there might not be any left! I was once in love with smoked paprika on deviled eggs, but these have made me go back to cayenne.

    I’m also now wondering if poking a small pinhole in the smaller end of the egg before boiling is worth the effort.

    • Yay! My trick worked and I forced you to make deviled eggs with my witch-power! Aren’t they GOOD??! I just love what the pickling brine does to the egg whites.

      I’m going to try your way with the smokes paprika, though. I’ve been trying to find more things to do with it.

      And, my mom used to poke the eggs with a pin before boiling to prevent the shell from cracking, but I think with this method (not literally boiling them) it’s not really necessary.

  4. Bahahaha a) love the costume and the fact that it is falling down. Hilair. b) fun eyeballs!!! You’re too cute :D

  5. P.S. I just read that you are looking for more paprika uses : my favorite paprika related dish is something super simple. Sliced red potatoes with skins on, boiled… tossed with like a good deal of butter, salt and LOADS OF PAPRIKA! TRY IT!!!!

  6. Ok, just so you know: if there’s an egg shortage in Austin, I’m not taking the rap. Due to popular demand, I now have to make a triple batch of these for every game left in the post-season. And as it turned out my good friend, for whom my hosting is payback for him doing so last year, brought his baseball-loving sister and her twin 8-year old baseball-loving daughters. When the question arose: how do you make these, I decided to be lazy and let you show them. So I fired up the Roku box and started up this episode. First of all, within 15 seconds you gained two new huge fans and I’ll bet you can guess what the twins now want to dress up as on Halloween. Fortunately, their mom says it’s completely doable and won’t cost that much. So thank you for not dressing up as the Statue of Liberty. Your two new little fans called me out though. I’ve been cheating by not brining the egg whites in pickled beet juice, just pepper juice, because 1) it’s not Holloween, yet and 2) I didn’t have any pickled beets. I was absolutely humiliated :) by two little girls wiggling their fingers at me and informing me that I need to start doing exactly what Hilah says to do.

    • Ahaha! That is fantastic! Tell their mom I got the wings at the Dollar Tree for exactly one dollar. The dress is just some stretchy fabric sewn into a tube with a safety pin at the top and haltered with the boa, which also came from the dollar store. Two dollar costume, considering I already had the fabric!

      I’m glad they liked the deviled eggs, too! Even if you weren’t doing it right. ;)

  7. i bought some bright iridescent pink pickled turnips at an indian store not long ago. i’m seriously tempted to try this and make them pink. if i do, i hope they turn out as good as these were. i love deviled eggs.

  8. Turmeric will dye anything yellow in a snap. It doesn’t take much to add a lot of yellow so the flavor won’t usually zoink your dish. If you want natural food coloring instead of the stuff with tons of unknown chemicals do an internet search for “natural food coloring” and you’ll get tons of info about it.

  9. I used mustard and cranberry mustard, instead of mayo and mustard and it had a nice tangy spice to it! I love your recipes – keep them coming!

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